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Tomato and Green Bean Salad

This Greek tomato and green bean salad is simply heirloom tomatoes, green beans, yellow wax beans, red onion, feta, and herbs. Perfect for summer.

White plate of tomato and green bean salad with feta, red onion, parsley, and mint

You don’t have to be Greek in order for this tomato, green bean, and feta salad to taste like home. Actually, you don’t even have to be at home for this salad to work its magic. We rather like bringing leftovers of this summery loveliness to lunch at work, often tossing in some extra feta and olives as well as a handful of almonds for a little supplemental substance. Because you need as much happiness as you can get at the office.–Renee Schettler

Tomato and Green Bean Salad

White plate of tomato and green bean salad with feta, red onion, parsley, and mint

This Greek tomato and green bean salad is simply heirloom tomatoes, green beans, yellow wax beans, red onion, feta, and herbs. Perfect for summer.

Michael Psilakis

Prep 30 mins

Total 30 mins

Salad

Greek

4 servings

250 kcal

5 / 3 votes

For the red wine and feta vinaigrette

For the salad

Make the vinaigrette

  • Combine the vinegar, onion, basil, thyme, feta, mustard, garlic, shallots, oregano, salt, and pepper in the bowl of a food processor. With the motor running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil until smooth and satiny. Season the dressing with pepper. You can use the vinaigrette immediately or set it aside for up to several days, stirring to recombine just before using.

Assemble the salad

  • Bring a pot of salted water to a boil. Fill a large bowl halfway with ice water. Blanch the beans until tender but still snappy, about 3 minutes. Then use tongs or a large slotted spoon to move them to the ice water bath, swishing them around. Drain well and place on a clean kitchen towel to dry.

  • In a bowl, combine the beans, feta, tomatoes, oregano, red onion, torn herbs, and as much of the vinaigrette as you desire and toss well. Taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, although taste it first as you may not need more salt due to the feta. 

*What is Greek oregano?

Oregano is generally divided into 2 types–Mediterranean and Mexican. And they’re completely different from each other. Shocked? We were, too. Mediterranean oregano is part of the mint family and grows throughout Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Egypt, and Morocco. Greek oregano, specifically, is also known as wild marjoram. It tends to be more earthy, while Italian is a little milder, and Turkish can be quite a bit more pungent but they’re all still the same basic plant.
Mexican oregano, just in case you were curious, is a relative of lemon verbena. It has a similar taste to Mediterranean oregano but with overtones of citrus and licorice.

Serving: 1portionCalories: 250kcal (13%)Carbohydrates: 18g (6%)Protein: 6g (12%)Fat: 18g (28%)Saturated Fat: 5g (31%)Polyunsaturated Fat: 2gMonounsaturated Fat: 11gCholesterol: 16mg (5%)Sodium: 1464mg (64%)Potassium: 585mg (17%)Fiber: 6g (25%)Sugar: 7g (8%)Vitamin A: 1778IU (36%)Vitamin C: 31mg (38%)Calcium: 205mg (21%)Iron: 3mg (17%)

Recipe Testers’ Reviews

Originally published August 22, 2011

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