Recipes from the Internet

Recipes

Gingerbread Biscuits

These gingerbread biscuits are sweetly old-school in their elegance. Containing ginger, allspice, mace, and black treacle, they’re not your traditional icing-buttons, little kid Christmas cookies.

Gingerbread biscuits on a gold-rimmed plate, flanked by two cups of tea and gold Christmas ornaments.

Adapted from Regula Ysewijn | The Official Downton Abbey Christmas Cookbook | Weldon Owen, 2020

Gingerbread, which has a long history in much of Europe, first appeared in English cookery books in the late fourteenth century. It was often molded into human shapes—frequently lovers, sometimes even kings and queens—using a wooden mold. According to The Oxford Companion to Sugar and Sweets, Elizabeth I commanded her kitchen to shape gingerbread to resemble her courtiers, suitors, and others, which she would then have served to them. By the early nineteenth century, a similar custom was popular at local fairs, where gingerbread “husbands” were bought by girls looking for a sweetheart. Simpler shapes, such as large squares and freeform biscuits, were sold as well, both at fairs and at bakeries. In the Victorian era, gingerbread figures became popular Christmas-tree ornaments.—Regula Ysewijn

Gingerbread Biscuits FAQs

I’ve cut out my cookie shapes. How do I get them off the parchment paper easily?

If you have difficulty removing the gingerbread from the parchment, flip it over onto the baking sheet (after you’ve removed the cookie cutters and scrap dough first), and peel the floured sheet of parchment off the dough.

What is black treacle? What else can I use in this gingerbread?

Black treacle is what is used as molasses in the United Kingdom. It’s somewhere between molasses and blackstrap molasses. If you have both, we’d suggest mixing them half and half to achieve the balance of sweet and bitter. If not, use just regular molasses—using just blackstrap molasses will make the biscuits too bitter. The author also suggests using golden syrup or light molasses if you want a lighter flavor.

Gingerbread Biscuits

Gingerbread biscuits on a gold-rimmed plate, flanked by two cups of tea and gold Christmas ornaments.

This recipe from Eliza Acton’s 1845 book, Modern Cookery, was so popular that Florence White included it in Good Things in England, published in 1932. An old-style gingerbread, it calls for black treacle, which yields a pungent result. For a milder flavor, swap out the black treacle for golden syrup or light molasses.

Regula Ysewijn

Prep 25 mins

Cook 30 mins

Total 1 hr

Dessert

British

20 biscuits

142 kcal

No ratings yet

  • Preheat the oven to 275°F (135°C). Line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, ginger, allspice, and mace. Add the butter and, using your fingers, rub it into the flour mixture until the mixture is the consistency of coarse bread crumbs.
  • Add the sugar and stir with a wooden spoon until fully incorporated. Pour in the treacle or molasses and mix until blended.
  • Knead the dough in the bowl until smooth and evenly dark, about 2 minutes.

  • Lay a sheet of parchment paper on a work surface, dust it lightly with flour, place the dough in the center, and pat it into a thick, fat disk.

  • If using a cookie cutter, roll out the dough a scant 1/4 inch (6 mm) thick. Using a cutter in any shape you like, cut out as many biscuits as possible. Move them to the prepared pans, spacing them about 3/4 inch (2 cm) apart. Gather up the scraps, roll out, cut out more biscuits, and add to the pans.

  • If using a wooden gingerbread mold, roll out the dough about 1/3 inch (8 mm) thick or thicker, depending on the depth of the carving. Dip the mold into water and dust lightly with flour. Cut a piece of rolled-out dough about 1 1/4 inches (3 cm) larger than the carving. Lay it on the prepared mold, then roll the rolling pin over the mold, pushing the dough into the carving. Trim any excess dough from the edge of the mold and turn the biscuit out onto a prepared pan. Repeat to make as many biscuits as possible, adding them to the pans and spacing them about 1 inch (2.5 cm) apart. Gather up the scraps, roll out, press out more biscuits, and add to the pans.
  • Bake the biscuits, rotating the pans back to front halfway through baking, until crisp, about 30 minutes. Let cool on the pans on wire racks for 5 minutes, then transfer the biscuits to the racks and let cool completely.

Serving: 1servingCalories: 142kcal (7%)Carbohydrates: 25g (8%)Protein: 2g (4%)Fat: 4g (6%)Saturated Fat: 2g (13%)Polyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 10mg (3%)Sodium: 5mgPotassium: 153mg (4%)Fiber: 1g (4%)Sugar: 9g (10%)Vitamin A: 111IU (2%)Vitamin C: 1mg (1%)Calcium: 24mg (2%)Iron: 1mg (6%)

Recipe Testers’ Reviews

Originally published December 16, 2021

HUNGRY FOR MORE?

#leitesculinaria on Instagram If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #LeitesCulinaria. We’d love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.Source

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *