Recipes from the Internet

Recipes

3 Smart Lessons We Learned from This 300-Square-Foot Micro Condo

Mitch Johnson knows people are surprised when they find out that he lives in a tiny, 300-square-foot condo in Washington, D.C. “I specifically chose living in a studio so I could focus my finances and enjoy life,” says Johnson, who shares the space with Winston, his Jack Russell terrier. “Living in D.C. and working in the nonprofit field already meant that housing costs were going to be a significant part of my budget, so going tiny was a way to minimize those costs,” he explains.

We took the tour, and let’s just say we were impressed with what Johnson has done with the small, narrow kitchen! While we were gawking and reading Johnson’s story, we learned three smart lessons. And now we want to pass them along to you!

1. Interior design isn’t a race.

Designing your home is an ever-evolving process. You don’t have to race to finish designing your place right when you first move in, says Johnson. “Take some time to live in your space, and see what works,” he says. You don’t want to do everything at once and risk regretting some choices!

2. Tiny doesn’t mean cluttered.

While it may seem like having a small space means clutter can accumulate more easily, that just isn’t the case in Johnson’s home.”I have a minimalist aesthetic, but I am a hoarder at heart and have collected a lot of stuff over the years,” says Johnson. Look at his kitchen and you’ll see that he really does have a lot of stuff (that’s practically a full bar up there!) — it’s just that Johnson has learned to be selective and displays items with intention.

3. There’s always room for plants.

Plants are an easy way to make a room look bigger and bring the outdoors in. “I really like a more eclectic bohemian vibe, so you see that reflected in a lot of the accessories and in the large number of plants,” Johnson says of his home. In the kitchen alone, Johnson hangs potted plants from the ceiling and perches cute greenery along his countertop.

Do you live in a tiny home? Tell us your small-space design advice.

Source

You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *